Google to Allow Hemp and CBD Product Ads in Select Markets

Marijuana Moment says that Google will stop saying that ads for hemp and CBD products are not allowed. The internet and technology corporation amended its “Dangerous Products and Services and Healthcare and Medicines” section to reflect the changes.

 

Google’s decision to limit the policy change to two states and one U.S. territory is puzzling, considering hemp and its derivatives like CBD are federally permitted and sold nationwide.

 

The major cannabis-containing medicine, Epidiolex, is federally approved, raising worries about regional limitations.

 

To advertise hemp and CBD products on Google, companies must apply to LegitScript, a payments processor that works with Google. “Products seeking certification must give LegitScript with samples to test for legal THC limits and a third-party Certificate of Analysis,” the business claimed. LegitScript will charge companies for “processing and monitoring applicants”

 

CBD and other hemp-based cannabinoids are permitted throughout the U.S. under the 2018 Farm Bill, so there’s no logical reason for Google to eliminate the ban exclusively for U.S. states and territories according to a report in Ganjapreneur.

 

“Certain formats, including YouTube Masthead, will not be eligible for serving,” the company mentioned. “CBD will be removed from the Unapproved Pharmaceuticals and Supplements list. All ads promoting other CBD-based products, including supplements, food additives, and inhalants, continue to be disallowed.”

 

Google’s move could benefit the hemp business, especially if it’s expanded to all states and territories. For campaigners, the policy change is also symbolic and fits with how other tech firms have matured on the subject.

 

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